Canola Digest Science 2014 Issue
Science

Wait for 60 percent seed colour change

By delaying swathing until 60 to 70 percent seed colour change on the main stem, canola fields have been shown to produce higher seed weights, greater oil content, lower green seed percentage and a higher grade.
Growing spring canola in the moderately short growing season of the Canadian Prairies always tests the tipping point between maximum maturity time (to produce maximum yield) and avoiding the first frost. With growers taking on more acres than ever, the time crunch at harvest can make it tempting to begin swathing early. But the yield...
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Science

Earlier seeding generally increases yield

Early spring seeding typically benefits canola yield and quality. An early planting date enables the crop to take advantage of good spring moisture, avoid some heat stress at flowering, and reduce the risk of fall frost damage. Key practice: Crops seeded early (in late April or early May, depending on the region) will out-yield canola...
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Science

Thicker stands improve weed management

Key practice: Higher seeding rates mean a more competitive crop, which can translate into higher yields and lower in-crop weed management costs. Key research: Harker, K.N., Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), et al. “High-Yield No-Till Canola Production on the Canadian Prairies.” Canadian Journal of Plant Science. (2012). Harker, K.N., AAFC, et al. “Seeding Rate, Herbicide...
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