Science

Mapping a route to clubroot resistance

Twelve molecular markers were identified that will be useful in breeding programs including gene pyramiding for durable clubroot resistance.
Key practice: P. brassicae can rapidly adapt to the selection pressure provided by currently available clubroot-resistant canola varieties. For durable clubroot resistance, it will be important to stack resistance genes and rotate them in clubroot-infested fields. Project title, Lead researcher: “Studies on the genetic and molecular basis for clubroot resistance in canola,” 2010-15, Stephen Strelkov,...
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Science

Understanding the cellular mechanisms of clubroot disease and developing a new form of clubroot resistance

Key practice: Rather than using genetically resistant varieties or the application of soil amendments and fungicides, this study is working to develop a new, alternative approach to clubroot resistance by silencing pathogen gene expression within the plant itself. Project title, Lead researcher: “Genomics of Clubroot disease development in canola and development of in-plant RNAi to...
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Science

Yield drops with fewer than five plants per square foot

Key Practice: Analysis of 35 canola seeding rate studies shows that hybrid canola can achieve its yield potential when at least five plants per square foot survive to harvest. Project Title, Lead Researcher: “Determining the economic plant density in canola,” 2009, Steve Shirtliffe, University of Saskatchewan Grower Organization Funder: ACPC, SaskCanola This meta-analysis of 35...
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Science

Phosphorus is often under-applied

Key practice: In the seed row is the best time and place for the first 15 to 20 lb./ac. of phosphate — which is the amount most likely to produce an economic return in the year of application. However, this rate is not enough to match crop removal, which may lead to phosphorus shortages over...
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Science

Genetics will reduce harvest losses

A recent study by Andrea Cavalieri with the University of Manitoba found that pod shatter is primarily impacted by genotype, while environment is the dominant driver for pod drop.
Key practice: Canola varieties with pod shatter tolerance have arrived. Pod shatter tolerance adds more flexibility for harvest timing, allowing crops to stand longer with fewer losses. Key research: Cavalieri, A., University of Manitoba, et al. “Pod Drop and Pod Shatter Are Not Closely Related in Canola.” Crop Science (2014). Gan, Y., Agriculture and Agri-Food...
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